Category Archives: Twitter

Adwords, Facebook, and Twitter Advertising Tips for Small Businesses

Online advertising is an infinitely growing area of expertise that can seem downright daunting to the average business owner. How much money do you need to spend? What platform will help you reach your target audience? How can you do better than your competitors?Adwords, Facebook, and Twitter...

These are all important questions! While they cannot be simply answered in a sentence or two, we can provide you with a starting point for better understanding the best practices of advertising through Adwords, Facebook and Twitter. Take a look!

Adwords

Adwords is Google’s online advertising program and a smart place to start if you’re just jumping into online advertising. Luckily, Google provides a depth of information to help you understand what they offer and how to get started. First, explore their different campaigns and identify which one is right for meeting your goals. Google will then walk you through setting a budget, formatting your campaign and choosing your keywords and placement.

If you’re ready to get a bit more advanced with your Adwords campaign, here are five strategies and money-making tips worth trying. One of the hottest features, and one you’ve likely experienced personally, is Google’s product-specific remarketing. You can advertise the exact product a customer was viewing on your site, allowing you to hit a hot lead and close the sale.

Facebook

Shifting the gears toward social media advertising, it’s only fitting to begin this conversation with a highlight of Facebook advertising opportunities for small businesses. Facebook is one of the largest and best ways small businesses can reach their target audience, build “likes” and push people to their website through social media. But you can also waste a lot of money, too, if you don’t know the basics.

Much like Google Adwords, Facebook has made it simple and straightforward to learn about their advertising options and get started creating an ad. But, also like Adwords, not all campaigns are created equal. You want to create several different versions of an ad (varying photos and test) and test it out before fully committing to your final version. You can track the clicks and then choose the best performing ad to run with.

Instead of creating traditional ads, you can also pay a little bit to boost a post. For example, if you are announcing a new product or promotion via a post on your business’s Facebook page, you can pay to boost this post and several thousand more users for an investment of only a few dollars. But be sure to share a link or call to action to encourage people to visit your website or make a purchase based upon your post!

Twitter

Last but not least, let’s talk Twitter advertising. Start by logging in and exploring your own advertising dashboard. You can see recent and popular tweets with the opportunity to promote them, similar to Facebook. A new addition to Twitter is their conversational ads which aim to make it easier for users to share and promote your brand with the simple click of a call to action button. For small businesses, this may be a good option for you if you want your customers to easily share your products or links to your content. The addition of hashtags makes this an even more powerful advertising tool.

Most importantly, keep in mind that you can dump a ton of money into Twitter (or any type of online) advertising without achieving meaningful results unless you are strategic with the content in your ads. Carefully think through your promotions and include calls to action. You’re paying for people to see your campaign, now what do you want them to do with the information? Be sure you have an answer to this question before you spend any money on Adwords, Facebook or Twitter!

Do you currently use Adwords, Facebook or Twitter to advertise your business or brand? Share what you’ve learned or ask a question by commenting below!

~Stephanie

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Are You a Social Snob? Rethink Your #Twitter Practices

Middle School Social BehaviorCFC78D87-5532-4290-BC86-D396199081FE
If given a choice to return to one’s middle school years, it’s doubtful many would say, “Sure, sign me up. I’d live in middle school forever!”

Do you remember those days? Kids who sat at the cool kid table during lunch felt obligated to demonstrate certain behaviors to remain at the table. Those who were not at the table observed what it took to sit there with that group. While some kids imitated and embraced the game, others avoided these kids all together.

If you’re not embracing your social media followers, you’re still in middle school sitting at what you think is the cool table (or trying to get there)—and you’re losing thousands of followers, views, and potential advocates because of this hold over attitude from childhood.

Reasons People Use Twitter
Let’s consider why people sign up for social media accounts.

1. I want to make money.
2. I want current information and opinions.
3. I want to be entertained.
4. I want interaction with others.
5. I want to influence.

There is a common thread through each of these motivations. That’s right. “I.” People on your Facebook, G+, Instagram, Pinterest, You Tube or Twitter accounts participate for self-gratification—even if that’s on behalf of a mission or charity. In your real life (the one you physically attend), ignoring the person who wants “two minutes of your time” or not responding to the secretary who says, “Good morning,” might be expected behaviors of you because of your perceived status in your world—however large or small that fish bowl may be.

But, in the big bowl of social media, anyone can be a celebrity and anyone can be a flop. The real gems of social media achieve the above five goals for themselves and others (and have more fun) with the following best Twitter practices:

Follow Back Real People.
Look at who’s following you. Go over to the other person’s page. Preview his or her bio and last ten tweets to decide if he or she is legit. Then, follow back. Remove the person if he or she annoys you, spams you, or plays the unfollow game.

Celebrities and celebrity social medians, search your name to find out what people are saying about you. Just by following them, you’ll build bridges with both fans and critics. Following others doesn’t mean you’re endorsing them. People know that if you follow a lot fans, you don’t know them all personally.

Respond to Mentions.
For some social media users, the online sense of community begins to parallel real life. Maybe you’ve met some of your followers at conventions or know them through business. Now, you have a face with a name. If you know the person and don’t care to associate with him or her, ignoring or blocking that person’s Twitter or G+ mentions is okay. However, remember that social media is its own world. You may do more harm to your goals than good by being a social media jerk. If you rarely see the person in real life, how much of a threat does it really pose to be polite? Are you sure you aren’t the problem?

If you don’t know the follower and don’t respond to his or her mention, you taint your brand. Absorb that statement.  Giving the cold shoulder makes companies, executives, and celebrities look bad. When fans take the time to participate in live tweeting sessions for their favorite TV shows, movies, conferences, or books and receive no response, it’s a turn off. Respond appropriately after someone takes time to comment on your blog post, tweet, meme, or picture. Better yet, maintain the relationship by revisiting the person’s page a few weeks down the road and commenting on one of their tweets. You’re doing a terrible job promoting if you ignore the people you’re trying to sell. Communicating demonstrates that you’re human and worth admiring. If you have people who perform social media tasks for you, make sure they know your parameters and Twitter’s best practices. Newbie Twitter user Kevan Lee puts it this way,

“When someone retweets you, mentions you in a tweet, or favorites one of your tweets, they are seeking a connection with you. From a certain perspective, this is a truly humbling event. Someone has valued you and your profile enough that they want to connect. It’s kind of an honor.”

Start Conversations.
Challenge yourself to interact by starting a conversation. You might make a friend or long term fan and learn something new. If you’re the social median for a business, find customers by searching for your products’ or services’ keywords. Then, start conversations about how fans are using the products or services. If a blogger writes about your brand, reach out to that person and thank them (or at least connect with them via social media.)

Do not play junior high cool kid as a celebrity or executive. Be a leader. If you’re asked a legitimate question or someone offers a compliment or interesting observation about your brand, unless you have legal reasons not to do so, take a moment and respond! You’re human and your fans want to see it. If you are not human, can’t afford a really good ghost tweeter, or hate being social, stay off the medium.

Unfollow Automated Accounts.
Unfortunately, after a social media account grows to a certain size, fake accounts will follow you for a period of time in hopes that your followers will follow the fake accounts, too. This helps fake accounts to build followership so the owners of those accounts can tweet out articles with links for SEO and promotional reasons and have armies to boost numbers. This industry is big business. Don’t waste your time on the game. Generously add real followers, but ignore the profiles asking you to buy followers. You can usually spot them by their numbers. Anyone who has say, 150K followers, but is following 5K, is probably a short term follower of your account. Within a couple weeks, they’ll drop you and then repeat the cycle later if you drop them.

Use Lists.
When you add fans, your stream fills up with content. It’s now time to create lists. Create categories based on the type of content you really want to read. You don’t have to follow someone to have him or her on a list. Create lists for your hobbies, passions, charities, news, industry associates, or hard core fans. Now you have the option to read everything in your stream or to visit certain lists.

Twitter for Celebrities
You have the potential to be a better celebrity or executive in the social media world than you are in the real one. Start minding details and tweeking habits to better connect with your fan base.

If you don’t consider yourself a VIP, remember that social media is a level playing field. Anyone can become a social media VIP, just by fulfilling the needs mentioned above, while being a courteous communicator. Don’t live in middle school forever. The world is so much bigger.  ~Jean

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How to Build a Content Marketing Strategy across Paid, Earned and Owned Media

To effectively market your content, you must have a strategy that includes the use of paid, earned and owned media. Bombarding your target audience with only paid advertising or relying solely on your owned media such as your website or social media to spread the word creates major blind spots in your overall marketing plan. It also leaves a lot of missed opportunities on the table where you could have reached a broader audience if you had spread your efforts out into all three types of media.Promotion Plan

Before you can sit down and build content marketing strategies using paid, earned and owned media, you must first understand the differences among the three. Let’s take a closer look at what each type of media brings to your marketing strategy.

Paid Media

Most obviously, you can purchase advertising through almost every social media platform. Facebook provides the ability to create highly-targeted ads that appear either in users’ newsfeeds or on the sidebar. You can also promote your tweets or buy clicks on StumbleUpon or Reddit. Carefully consider your target audience and the type of social media that they are most likely to use.

Aside from social media, you might choose to use Google AdWords to boost your SEO or pay for placement on another website or blog. Using all of these tactics can be quite costly to implement. Determine your budget for this piece of your marketing strategy and do you research on what form of paid media will give you the highest ROI.

Earned Media

Out of the three categories, earned media can be the trickiest piece to implement successfully. The simplest reason for this is because you are really not in control. You are asking for other people to share your content because they find it to be of value, but you are not paying them to do so.

Some options for earned media include submitting your content as a guest contributor to a blog or website that’s relevant to your target audience. You should also share the content multiple times and in various ways on social media (sites like StumbleUpon, Reddit, Linkedin and Pinterest are especially effective) encouraging readers to share with their networks. You can also attempt to spark discussion (and sharing) in Linkedin groups. You can also pitch your article to a blogger or professional writer who may be interested in featuring a review or op-ed piece of the article.

Owned Media

Finally and most obviously is promoting your content on the media that you already own and control. This includes your social media, email lists, website and blog to name just a few common assets. This is low hanging fruit that you should always take advantage of as part of your ongoing marketing strategy.

For example, if you publish an article, create a home for this content on your website and publish it on your blog. Then promote these links on your social media accounts (for Linkedin you may consider publishing the entire article on your profile as well). Finally, incorporate some of the content of this article into an email blast to your lists to offer valuable and relevant information tailored to what is likely to interest them. By consistently marketing your content across owned media, you will maximize its impact and fuel your website and social media with fresh, high-quality content that will increase your SEO.

Now that you have a better understanding of the different ways you can promote your content across paid, earned and owned media, now is the time to get started creating your own diverse strategy that uses a little bit of each. Most importantly, remember that even the best marketing strategy still needs high quality content in order to be successful. Provide valuable information and give your readers every opportunity to find it!

How have you build an effective media campaign including paid, earned and owned media? Share your experience by commenting below!

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Twitter’s 6 Distinct Communication Networks and How to Utilize Them

While Twitter is considered a social media network, many people think of it as another version of Facebook, simply a place to “follow” people and “like” things. However, Twitter is becoming more useful for information, news, business, and politics. Twitter is definitely more than “just another Facebook,” as people are starting to use it in political fields, to get a specific message out to followers, as a means of networking, and as a way for businesses to reach out to and communicate with their customers.

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Graph courtesy of Pew Research

As a whole, Twitter is one large social media network. However, it can be broken down into six different communication networks, each with a specific purpose. Many people can easily fit into multiple categories, as the communication networks are so diverse. According to Pew Research, they break down into six separate networks that require a bit of explanation: divided, unified, fragmented, clustered, in-hub and spoke, and out-hub and spoke.

  1. Divided or Polarized Crowds: This communication network breaks down to two large groups, typically made up for different opinions or opposing viewpoints. Usually, group members of the divided communication network focus on topics such as politics that operate with separate “echo chamber” structures. More often than not, these “polarized crowds” function not by arguing, but by simply ignoring one another. In terms of politics, the best way to utilize the divided communication network is as a sort of platform. While their communication network is not a close reflection of the whole U.S. population, they are able to reach out to their followers (and occasionally their opposition) by use of hashtags within their tweets.
  2. Unified or Tight Crowds: This communication network is made up for two to six medium-sized groups. The unified communication network focuses more on hobbies and professional topics, with little to no involvement from outsiders. The participants in the tight crowds are much more interactive with each other and often encourage the introduction of new members. They follow one another (and frequently encourage their followers to follow others in their groups) and interact more with one another than those in the divided communication network. The best way to utilize the tight crowds of the unified communication network (whichever group you may be involved in) is simply to be active. Tweet using hashtags, respond to tweets, and follow people within the network.
  3. Fragmented or Brand Clusters: The fragmented communication network is made up of many small groups, focusing on brands, popular subjects, or big events. When topics this large are tweeted about, the groups involved are large but the participants in the groups are much more isolated from one another. For example, if two Twitter users mention the same even or celebrity, it’s likely that they have no other connection to one another. The utilization of this network is simply the passage of ideas from one person to another, with very little connection otherwise.
  4. Clustered or Community Clusters: The clustered communication network is made up of many small or medium-sized groups and circulates around larger events. A good example of community clusters is a global news story being reported by any of the major news stations. Each news station has their own followers; those followers make up the community clusters specific to each news station. It’s similar with the more sensationalized celebrity news, radio stations, and even sports teams. Each has a specific version of the message to get across, but the followers of each can be broken into separate, clustered groups of followers.
  5. In-Hub and Spoke or Broadcast Networks: The in-hub and spoke communication network is often made up of one large group and some secondary groups. This communication network is largely based on repeating and retweeting what is posted by media organizations and news stations. The “hub and spoke” structure is the media or news outlets (the hub) that originally posts the information or content and the followers (the spokes) who retweet the messages to their followers. The majority of the utilization and involvement in this communication network is from the spoke angle, those who repeat the message given out by the hubs.
  6. Out-hub and Spoke or Support Networks: Similar to broadcast networks, support networks are made up of one large group and other secondary groups. In support networks, however, the hub replies to the spokes, creating the opposite hub-and-spoke structure of the broadcast networks. In both networks, the spokes are the very disconnected secondary groups, while the hubs are the large groups. A good example of support networks are the customer service departments of some major businesses.

By first deciding how you want others to perceive you on social media, you begin to identify which communication network(s) you will likely become a part of. Any one person can be involved in more than one network, but it depends on how you want to use your profile—some become active to get information about politics, some view it as the news at their fingertips, some use it to get more involved with causes they believe in, other use it to connect with people than share their interest. By deciding your profile early and utilizing the communication networks you are part of, you set the tone for any future connections. ~Holly

 

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5 Tips for Creating a Killer Twitter Bio

Twitter is a complex social media platform that pushes out content faster than the blink of an eye (or the flap of a wing). This is where you can connect with anyone from your neighbor down the street to a celebrity across the globe. To be able to standout in such a large network, you must first begin with a profile that grabs people’s attention and makes them want to connect with you.Twitter bio

While a Twitter profile is fairly simple and straightforward, people often miss out on this valuable opportunity to enhance their brand images by representing their skills and interests. Let’s take a look at five tips for creating a creative and quality twitter profile to make the biggest impact in the shortest amount of content.

  1. Make the Most of 160 Characters

Your Twitter profile allows for just 160 characters of content. Although this is a “generous” 20 characters more than what you are allowed in a tweet, it is still and incredibly short amount of space into which you must cram everything that makes you special. The key is to strategically pick what aspects of your brand you wish to highlight.

Think of the qualities that will most appeal to the people you are trying to connect with. Is it your job title, an accomplishment like publishing a book or some snarky humor that will draw in target followers? Choose 1-3 of the most powerful aspects of your brand and make these the forefront of your Twitter profile content. All the rest of the stuff people can find by clicking on the link to your website or blog (more on that later).

  1. Pick Your Voice

You can go several directions with the voice of your Twitter profile. Do you want it to be first person or third person? Do you want to sound professional or personable? Think about what is going to represent you most accurately and speak to your target audience. The voice of your Twitter profile will set the tone for your conversations moving forward.

  1. Get Personal with Interests, Hobbies or Humor

Once you’ve listed your job and accomplishments, be sure to save (even just a little bit of) room for your interests, hobbies and personality. What do you do outside of work? Maybe this is a mention of your favorite physical activity, type of food or a shout out to your family. Use this final sentence as a way to define yourself by more than just your job title.

  1. Incorporate #Hashtags

Include hashtags in your Twitter profile, especially ones that you use often. Maybe this is your own unique hashtag that helps store, say, all of your motivational quotes in one stream. Or maybe you list a few popular hashtags that reflect your hobbies and interests. Limit these to just several of the most relevant topics that define your brand.

  1. Include a Link

Finally, be sure to take advantage of including a link in your Twitter profile. What should this link to? It depends! It could be your website, blog, Linkedin profile or other social media profile. What do you use most often and where do you want to direct people to learn more about you? No matter what link you choose to use, be sure that it is active and that it leads to updated and professional content that will leave a good first impression with your Twitter followers.

What other strategies have you found to be effective when creating a Twitter profile? Share your insights by commenting below!

~Stephanie

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Ten Alternative Search Engines and Social Media Sites

Alternative Social MediaWe can all name the most popular websites for search and social networking, but what about the countless other options available to us? Some of these alternative search engines and social media sites provide unique benefits that can help you search and socialize even more effectively than the big guys!  Whether you are looking to completely break away from the mega-brands of search and social media, like Google and Facebook, or whether you simply want to explore some new options, here are ten recommendations worth checking out:

 

  1. Blekko

Blekko is an innovative search engine with a clean and modern look. Most notably about Blekko is that it uses an initiative called “slashtags.” This is essentially a text tag preceded by a “/” slash character, which can be used for custom and categorized searches. One of its best features might be its categorized results which help you to quickly hone in on the information that is most relevant to you. For example, search “Nike” and you can narrow results by categories including: quick answers, top results, shopping, shoes, news and more – all to help you find what you’re looking for in less time.

 

  1. SocialMention

If you’re looking for a platform to provide you with real-time social media search and analysis, then SocialMention is worth exploring. This site allows you to search any term and it will provide you with relevant social media results. Additionally, it will also analyze these results by strength, sentiment, passion, reach and top keyword so you can monitor the trend and identify where most of your mentions are originating.

 

  1. BuzzSumo

BuzzSumo is a valuable tool for SEO research. For example, if you want to analyze what content performs best for a particular topic or competitor, BuzzSumo is able to provide you with this type of insight. Enter the keyword you wish to search and BuzzSumo will identify the most shared links on social networks, as well as influencers for specific topics. This is a must-visit for anyone looking to improve their search rankings on the web.

 

  1. DuckDuckGo

It may not be that you have anything to hide, but sometimes you just don’t want your search history made easily accessible to anyone who wants to dig around in your personal life. DuckDuckGo is an anonymous search engine, and while it doesn’t provide you with personalized results based on your search history, it does offer the peace of mind of complete anonymity.

 

  1. Topsy

Calling all Twitter junkies, if you want to easily search and analyze the hottest trends on this particular platform, then you should try this one! Topsy allows you to search by time and place, set alerts, and analyze sentiment for every tweet ever made – seriously. This can result in valuable marketing information like how often a term is tweeted or who is an influential person on a specific subject.

 

  1. GoodSearch

If you want to “do good” while searching the web, GoodSearch has combined both of these elements into a single search engine. How it works is that GoodSearch donates 50 percent of its revenue to charities and schools selected by its users. GoodSearch also helps users identify other “do good” businesses through features like GoodShop, a catalog of merchants that support charitable causes; GoodDining, a year-round “dine out for charity” program; and GoodSurvey, market research surveys that allow people to earn money for their favorite causes. This search engine is powered by Yahoo and on average pulls in 510,000 unique monthly visitors.

 

  1. Wolfram│Alpha

If you have a passion for trivial information and desire instant access to all the world’s facts and data, then WolframAlpha might become your new favorite search engine. This platform is a computational knowledge engine that uses externally “curated data” to answer fact-based questions in a matter of seconds.

 

  1. DogPile

DogPile is by no means new; it’s a tried and true alternative search engine that maintains its appeal because of its powered metasearch technology. Essentially DogPile runs its searches through Google, Yahoo and Yandex all at once and compiles a single list of results. Since each of these three search engines have their own methods for finding information, DogPile provides the advantage of running the equivalent of three searches with the single click of a button.

 

  1. Tumblr

This alternative social media site is growing in size and popularity. It’s an interesting hybrid between a short-form blog and a social networking site. Users create their own blogs and follow other blogs in a similar way to social networks. This platform has built in methods that drive a ton of engagement and visibility to its users blogs. Last year, Tumblr was the fastest growing social networking site even compared to Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest!

 

  1. Path

Path quite literally takes users “off the beaten path” with how they cultivate and interact with their social network. By limiting users to just 50 friends, Path allows users to share videos, photos and personal information with only the people who you know and trust. People’s Facebook networks have grown almost too large and impersonal and Path aims to take the trend back to fewer, but more meaningful communications.

 

So there you have it! Ten alternative search engines and social media sites that are work taking a look at if you desire something new and different. ~Stephanie

 

What other alternative sites have you used and liked? Share your recommendations by commenting below!

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Seven Social Media Mistakes

thumb downIn this day and age, social media is the quickest way to stay in touch with friends and family all over the world. With at least five popular platforms, social media is also turning into another way for businesses and individuals to promote themselves to others. Whether you’re just starting to dip your toes into the world of social media or you’ve been active for a while, there are certain guidelines to follow. An article from Business Insider (based on a survey of sorts conducted by a small business consultant by way of LinkedIn) helped narrow down the list of social media mistakes that are regularly being made.

Don’t post too often! Sometimes, often when people get bored or have time to kill, posting on Facebook or sending a tweet on Twitter becomes an hourly activity. Not only does this clog newsfeeds, it takes away from productivity. Think how much more you could get done at work if you weren’t posting every hour on the hour, even if it’s just a quick comment on something. While you want to actively post if you’re promoting a business, don’t post multiple times each day—keep it in moderation. However, do make sure to check your page often. Many times customers will post to your page or send you a message consisting either of praise or a complaint. More often than not, these comments go completely unnoticed and are left without a response.

Don’t avoid posting—followers do want you to be active on social media! Posting once or twice (at most) a day will suffice. Sometimes business only post once or twice a week! Followers may be more likely to interact with you if they see your name once or twice in a newsfeed where they see other names upwards of four times. Keep in mind that commenting on posts is very different from posting in itself—customers will be happy to receive a response from you on something they posted on your page, whether they gave negative or positive feedback.

Don’t post or share irrelevant information or content. If you’re a small business owner, say an online store specializing in clothing, don’t share political content or science-related articles via your business page. Instead, share a link to a new product you have in stock. Customers and followers want to hear about things relevant to them—they made the choice to follow your page, so make sure to consistently post things pertaining to your page.

Don’t limit your social media activity to just one forum. Many businesses create a Facebook page and think it is sufficient social media coverage. There is also Twitter, Instagram, G+, and LinkedIn (just to name a few). Why limit yourself? The only thing that could happen is your business could grow!

Don’t overshare on personal matters. Even if the focus of your time on social media is your business, you will likely end up making a page for yourself. When that happens, keep the private details of your life private. On each page, you represent your company, so your followers don’t need to visit your company’s page, find the link to your page, and see that your relationship just ended and you were out on the town the night before. Yes, posting pictures is fun, it’s a way for people to see you are enjoying life, but keep in mind all the people who could view your page. Each social media site offers a privacy setting, some even offer a way  to change who can see what you post—use these settings. Do not toe the line between what should remain personal and what should remain professional.

Don’t link to articles or products if the content isn’t complete! Everyone has come across it at one time or another—click on an article and begin reading only to notice grammar mistakes, simple spelling errors, or captions that are completely missing from pictures. It’s frustrating for the reader and it’s not going to give your company a professional image.

Don’t get involved in social media for the wrong reasons. Many companies are heavily involved with social media, but don’t jump the gun—work on building your company first, focusing on creating the relationships. After you have a solid customer base, progress to social media as a way to stay connected and keep customers updated. Creating, building, and maintaining relationships is a big focus for companies with social media activity.

It may seem daunting at first, but remember to start small and build your social media reputation as a small extension of your company. Keep the focus on your customers and your company, not on your personal life. With this list of basic social media mistakes, you’ll be able to build a strong social media profile to better connect with your customers and grow your business!  ~Hollysocial media icons

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