Category Archives: Search Engine Marketing

The Future of DuckDuckGo as a Viable Search Engine

Ever since the World Wide Web came into existence, the business of creating the best of the best search engine has been never-ending. When someone asks a question they do not know the answer to, a typical response is, “Why don’t you just Google it?” Obviously, Google has elevated its brand to be a proprietary eponym, a product that is so successful, that has come into general use to refer to the its generic class of objects rather than the specific brand type. Google is trusted by millions of Internet users around the globe.

Duck Duck Go Search EngineSoon though, there may be some new competition in the world of search engines. Instead of saying, “Google it,” you may hear people saying, “Duck it.” This is because DuckDuckGo is climbing the ranks in the search engine business and only time will tell how far it will get up the usage and acceptance ladder.

With so many search engines available, it seems that everyone has their favorite go-to engine for any information they may be seeking. Aside from Google, some of the other top search engines that the average Internet user knows include Ask.com, Bing, Yahoo, and YouTube (of course, it is owned by Google). Even Twitter and Facebook are used extensively for search. So what would make a user of any of these well-known search engines try out DuckDuckGo? Is there something that makes this newer search engine different? Is there something that clearly sets it apart from Google, Yahoo, Bing, and the others? Quite simply, the answer is, “Yes!”

DuckDuckGo has something known as Zero Click Information that provides you with info that goes above the traditional search results. It’s called Zero Click Information because you get what you are looking for right on the search page without having to click on a link unless you need further information. The information you get with this Zero Click technology includes, but is not limited to, a summary of the topic, images, and direct answers to whatever your questions are.

In addition to the perk of the Zero Click, there is also what is known as semantic topic detection. This technology lets the search engine take your questions and quickly sort through all available links, but only showing the topics it detected in your queries. For example, if you input a vague search item such as “apple,” DuckDuckGo actually inquires which meaning you want. Are you looking for information on fruit? Do you need some stats about the company Apple? This allows your search to be better targeted for the optimal results. And perhaps the biggest reason that DuckDuckGo may beat out other more popular search engines in the near future is that it is much less cluttered than other search engines. They have fewer advertisements and their spam is at the bare minimum. Clutter reduction is one of DuckDuckGo’s top priorities.

So, how is DuckDuckGo quacking along? Numbers don’t lie and when it was first introduced on September 25, 2008, the web traffic went up 50 percent in only eight short days. And if the above reasons aren’t convincing enough to convince you that DuckDuckGo is real competition to the other search engine giants, check this out: DuckDuckGo is not putting out a track on you. That’s right.

Duck Duck Go billboard adUnlike its competitors, such as Google, DuckDuckGo has a stellar privacy policy. And unlike other competitors, such as Yahoo, DuckDuckGo does all it can to simplify your search experience. You know how Yahoo and Google add suggested links at the top of your search? DuckDuckGo doesn’t do this. They actually WANT you to find what you need without a hassle. How refreshing is that?

It will definitely be interesting to see where this new search kid on the block ends up…at the front of the class or at the back of the bus.

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Filed under Marketing, Search Engine Marketing

Use a Mutual Fund Strategy to Counter Google

Diversify your search portfolio

Diversify your search portfolio

Investors learned the trick long ago. Place your hard-earned money in just one stock and it is win big or go home. Diversify your monies and invest in multiple stocks through mutual funds and minimize your risks. It’s a winning strategy eCommerce marketers should look to as well.

Why Build a One-Legged Stool? 

When it comes to search engine marketing, conversations drift towards how tactical efforts will affect the search engine result page ranking on Google. Of course, there are Bing, Ask, Dogpile, Duck Duck Go and a bunch of other search engine “also-rans,” but with two-thirds of all searches being conducted on Google according to comScore, they are the tail that wags the dog in search.

The attention given solely to and dominance of Google is not a good thing. Having all your marketing eggs in one large search basket places too much pass-fail risk in one channel. And, it’s one channel you can’t control. (Think of the next Google Panda or Penguin update.) This is similar to what investors learned to circumvent 80 years ago. Marketing diversification is the key to long-term growth and success.

Broaden Your Definition of Search 

Sure. Google is the #1 most visited web site according to Alexa rankings with its primary purpose being search. Facebook is #2 and is primarily a social network. But, at the very top of the Facebook site, there’s a search box! How does your product, brand, or service rank when searched on Facebook?

There’s a search box at or near the top of #6 Wikipedia, too. And #8 LinkedIn, #11 Twitter, and #12 Amazon. Of course, there’s Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, SlideShare, and dozens of other heavily visited web sites that all have search engines. Does a click on their search engine result pages lead to your site?

Internet Shoppers Leverage Amazon Reviews 

Why Amazon Matters Now More Than Ever

Why Amazon Matters Now More Than Ever

Forrester Research recently published a report called, Why Amazon Matters Now More than Ever. The study surfaced that, in 2012, 30% of online consumers were already using other approaches to search for and research products, like reading Amazon customer reviews, before making a purchase decision.  These shoppers were not necessarily making their purchase on Amazon. This behavior is on the increase. According to the study, only 13% of online users are researching a potential product purchase solely online through search engines like Google. Chalk one up for including Amazon in your search strategy. Be sure to add other review sites like Epinions.com, Buzzillions.com, ConsumerReports.org, ConsumerSearch.com, and CNET.com to your search marketing strategy list.

Smile for the Camera 

With more people than ever carrying smart phones with mega-pixel cameras embedded within them, consumers are being trained to digest image content quickly and easily. Three of the four top social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) have the same common characteristic – they place an emphasis on sharing images. The recent rapid rise to success of Pinterest and Buzzfeed only adds testaments to the viral power and search potential of image-based content.

Mean Stinks Photo Sharing

Mean Stinks Photo Sharing

Proctor & Gamble leveraged this trend recently with their “Mean Stinks” Secret deodorant campaign by creating a photo searching and sharing application to spread an anti-bullying message.  According to P&G, over 1.5 million girls spread awareness about girl-to-girl bullying through the generation of these images.

Successful brands that receive the most social image shares also have another common characteristic. They know how to pepper in some well-placed, creative images into their written content that drive consumers to search for them to share.

Spread the Wealth 

A solid search engine marketing strategy creates content that aims to improve the search engine results page rank for as many visit driving sites as possible, not just Google. Both what you do with content on your own web site, as well as these other web sites, can have a positive impact on many ways people can find your business or service when they search. Having a diversified content strategy in place also insures your site against being at the mercy of the next Google Dance, when your rankings on just that search engine slip a bit.

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Filed under Business Strategy, Content, Content Marketing, Marketing, Search Engine Marketing

What is Bing’s Subjectship and How does it Compare to Google’s Authorship?

UPDATE 2015: Google’s Authorship was scrapped by the end of 2013. We believe My Web Writers was a voice that contributed to this end. In an article, Forbes details the finale. Read My 2013 SMX Conversation with Matt Cutts about Google Authorship. About that time, Bing’s subjectship faded into an abyss, as well.

By Natalie

Authorship screen shot

Webmasters are always looking for the next great SEO boost. Google Authorship was launched this past year, so it was only natural that Bing would fire back with its own version, Bing Subjectship. Understanding the two and how they compare can help content writers and other authors and readers decide which they prefer from the world’s two favorite search engines.

Google Authorship

Although just a youngster, Google Authorship is proving itself as a successful tool to drive traffic to websites, especially blogs.  Look at the Google search to the right for “Google Authorship.” The photos you see are the authors of the articles.

Since Google added Authorship to its articles, the click-through rates are much higher than they were before.

Bing’s Subjectship

Bing decided to compete with Google via Bing Subjectship. Instead of seeing a picture of who wrote a specific article or blog post, you’ll see a picture of the subject matter.  If I wrote a popular blog post on a famous singer, my picture would show up next to the search result in Google, but Bing would show a picture of the famous singer and the picture might not be one I even used in my post.  Subjectship appears to be in an experimental stage.

This video further highlights some of the differences between Authorship and Subjectship:

After we contacted Bing for more information about Subjectship, we received the following reply.

It’s me again Docs from Bing Technical Support. We apologize for the delay of our response. We would like to provide you an update from our product group about your inquiry on Bing Subjectship. Allow me to discuss this with you.

Bing Support provides assistance for customers needing help with Bing and the features within Bing. We are unable to provide any additional information regarding Bing Subjectship nor any future plans and releases pertaining to Bing.

Thank you for your inquiry and interest in Bing.
Best Regards,

Docs
Bing Technical Support

So which do you find more appealing- a photo of who wrote the article or blog post, or a photo of who the post is about?

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Filed under Algorithms, Analytics, Blog Writing Tips, Content Marketing, Holiday Blog, Pictures, Search Engine Marketing, SEO (Search Engine Optimization), Website Linking

Maslow’s Hierarchy in your PPC Copy

By My Web WritersMaslow's Hierarchy of Needs

PPC (pay per click) campaigns are all about finding customers who are interested in the advertiser’s product, and then about enticing those people to click on the link, and finally to purchase the product or service offered.

Sounds simple, but the reality can be more complex. That’s why it’s helpful to find tools that will make the task easier. Using Maslow’s Hierarchy in your PPC copy is one way to increase the success of a website or ad campaign.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

What exactly is Maslow’s hierarchy? It’s a psychological theory proposed by AbrahamMaslow in 1943. The hierarchy is represented by a pyramid. Maslow suggested that people must meet needs at the base of the pyramid before they can worry about moving higher on the pyramid to meet the needs found there.

As one moves up the pyramid, the needs become less necessary for life, but focus on reaching ultimate fulfillment. The pyramid ranges from basic physiological needs at the base to self-actualization needs at the top.

 Using Maslow’s Hierarchy in PPC Campaigns

Just as Maslow’s hierarchy helps us make sense of human behavior, a similar hierarchy exists for PPC campaigns. At the base of the PPC pyramid might be the ad campaign account structure: the first step, before writing PPC copy is even begun, is to set up an ad account. What types of payment will be accepted? Is there a theme that can be mentioned consistently through the campaign? Account structure issues must be addressed before moving up the pyramid.

The next step up the pyramid for your PPC campaign might involve keywords. Keywords are a crucial consideration, since the keywords you choose will directly influence how many potential customers reach the copy you will be writing. You can use Google Adwords’ Keywords Tool to determine keywords that your potential customers may be searching for. Aim for finding keywords with many monthly searches, but with low competition. Don’t assume your keywords will never change; you’ll want to monitor them often and tweak them as needed to keep up the traffic to your site.

Continuing our journey up the pyramid, we reach landing pages. These are the pages that potential customers will reach when their keyword searches lead them to your site. Design your landing page carefully, and look at it from a potential customer’s eyes: does it answer the questions your customer may be asking? Is there a call to action to purchase the product or service you’re offering? Spend time creating landing pages that will entice those who arrive on them.

Finally, we reach the pyramid’s pinnacle: the ad copy itself. It may seem surprising that we’re only now discussing the actual PPC copy, but just as Maslow’s hierarchy suggests that humans can only achieve self-actualization after meeting all the needs beneath, your PPC campaign copy can only be as effective as all the pyramid levels beneath it.

Your PPC copy should utilize the keywords you identified earlier. A call to action – often, to make a purchase – should be evident. Talk to potential customers. What phrases would entice them to move from interest to buying? Incorporate these suggestions into your ad copy to turn readers into buyers.  ~Susan

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Filed under PPC, Search Engine Marketing